Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Content is king, but promotion is queen.— P.J. Feinstein

How much author promo should I be doing? I tweet, post on Instagram, make all calls on my Facebook page and update my YA blog. While it is part and parcel of being an author, you would think that I could keep things to a minimum since I am not self-published. Yet I see very well-known authors doing the same. Authors with an agent, a large publishing house behind them and a history of sales. It seems it is now embedded in publishing. For me, the reality of online sales is that my book is competing with millions of other books. How does one gain visibility if no one even knows it exists?

I spend too much time on my devices working to develop exposure. Trying to balance promo with social media fatigue is proving to be challenging. It is a fine line between getting the word out, wearing yourself out and tiring out your followers. I mean, folks only want to see my book flogged so many times. When does it shift from interesting and informative to eye-rolling frustration? I wish I had the answer.

In an attempt to keep things varied, I’ve been experimenting with a variety of free software. My latest is Adobe Spark Video. I’m doing a giveaway over at Goodreads, a signed copy of Cutting to the Chase, and I wanted something different to promo.

What do you think? Does it add interest or is it just another way of presenting same old, same old? Are you tired of seeing authors endlessly promoting? Have you found a way around it? If so, what do you do to get the word out about your book or someone else’s? I would love to hear from both readers and writers on this.


And if anyone has any ideas about how to get my book into the hands of my target audience—teens—please, pretty please, share those too!


6 comments:

  1. Have you considered doing school visits? You could contact some of the local high schools and tell them you are a local author who wants to talk to the kids about writing and publishing. That allows you to connect with your audience and get your book in front of them. Of course, with school almost out for the summer you may have to wait for next year. Or maybe not.

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    1. That type of planning in schools usually happens in September. I'll hit them up then. I'm considering developing a teaching unit. After all, it's what I used to do. :0)

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  2. Rose, good luck! I'm not published--yet--and I find social media exhausting.

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    1. I find it both energizing and exhausting. It's difficult to find the balance, but I'm working on it. I will share all pearls of wisdom that I gather when you publish. Okay, really, I'll shout and cheer and commiserate as you navigate the same waters! ;o)

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    2. Hi Rose,

      Good luck with that! I think word-of-mouth might be even more important than promoting books online, although you probably need a relatively wide audience for that to really work. So far, I've done my best to promote your book ;) Maybe you could seek out websites for book-loving teens? I'm sure they exist.

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    3. Word of mouth is great and is certainly working. Just not sure it's hitting my target audience since I'm no longer directly connected with a teen audience. It seems the Internet is my definitely my greatest ally in this...other than wonderful supporters like you. ;0)

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